Articles outside Bodhi tagged "World"

The New Yorker: Unmournable Bodies
The scale, intensity, and manner of the solidarity that we are seeing for the victims of the Paris killings, encouraging as it may be, indicates how easy it is in Western societies to focus on radical Islamism as the real, or the only, enemy. This focus is part of the consensus about mournable bodies, and it often keeps us from paying proper attention to other, ongoing, instances of horrific carnage around the world.

2 years

TeleSUR: We Are All - Fill in the Blank
Terrorism is not terrorism when a much more severe terrorist attack is carried out by those who are Righteous by virtue of their power. Noam Chomsky on the reactions to Charlie Hebdo attack.

2 years

The Hindu: Pounding Gaza with impunity
With Gaza reduced to Hamas, 1.8 million people who live in Gaza are made responsible for Hamas. This is the doctrine of collective responsibility, illegal by international law.

2 years

Guardian: Gabriel García Márquez obituary
Those dreams were prominent in García Márquez's speech when he was awarded the Nobel prize for literature in 1982. In it, he made a passionate appeal for European understanding of the tribulations of his own continent, concluding that "tellers of tales who, like me, are capable of believing anything, feel entitled to believe that it is not yet too late to undertake the creation of a minor utopia: a new and limitless utopia wherein no one can decide for others how they are to die, where love can really be true and happiness possible, where the lineal generations of one hundred years of solitude will have at last and forever a second chance on earth".

3 years

Guardian: Bob Crow, RMT leader, dies of suspected heart attack at 52
The legendary British union leader, Bob Crow, who once said, "I have got more in common with a Chinese labourer than I have with Sir Fred Goodwin. I'm anti-EU, but I'm pro-European. Real European support for me means when French dockers take action in Calais, we back it", dies of suspected heart attack at 52.

3 years

New Left Review: New Masses?
Paradoxically, it is not so much in the recession-struck Northern heartlands but in the neo-capitalist Second World, and in the—supposedly booming—BRICS and emerging economies, that popular anger has made itself felt. In the East and South, what social forces and what politics are in play? Therborn analyses the oppositional potential of subordinate layers across six continents: pre-capitalist indigenous and peasant forces, ‘surplus’ populations, manufacturing workers, wage-earning middle classes. Under what conditions can defensive protests against the commercialization of public space and services, as in Turkey and Brazil, or popular anger at corrupt, repressive regimes—Ukraine, Maghreb, Mashreq—trigger alliances between them?

3 years

People's Democracy: The Indispensability of Marxism
While the days of colonialism are over, capitalism today reproduces within the country the same logic of destruction of petty production, the same expansion of the army of unemployed, semi-employed and under-employed mass, the same enchaining of the employed workers to a bare subsistence level even in the midst of significant increases in labour productivity, and hence the same increase in income inequalities, as had happened in the colonial period taking the metropolis and the colonies together. And it does so while super-imposing itself, and modifying for its own purposes, all the oppressive features of the pre-existing society, such as the caste-system, the exploitation of tribal people, and patriarchy. [...] This dream of building a humane society within capitalism is what had informed the weltanschaung of John Maynard Keynes and the post-war European social democratic movement. The achievements it had made within the capitalist system are today being reversed before our very eyes. The inequality in income and wealth over the world as a whole, and even within the advanced countries (and India as well), is growing rapidly and has reached an unprecedented level. In India itself poverty and malnutrition today are comparable to those of the years just preceding the Second World War. The world economy remains submerged in a crisis unprecedented in its scale since the Great Depression of the 1930s. All these prima facie constitute a vindication of Marxism.

3 years

Alliance @ IBM: IBM to fire 15000 employees worldwide, starting with Bangalore
I was RA'd yesterday at IBM STG Bangalore, it was a ruthless meeting with manager and HR citing reasons which I could have debated for hours for their misdoing , as you are aware bosses are "always right" .. Gave 2 hours time to leave and laptop was seized.The treatment was gruesome and inhuman and I think IBM has trained the managers very well to take these action. To quote some examples of inhumaness , there is an employee who is on honeymoon unaware what is in store for him when he returns as he is on the hit list. -EX- Employee STG Bangalore- [...] IBM India SWG Rational labs shootout news==100 out of 300 engineers flushed out of IBM building in waves of tears.....[..]-blindIBM-

3 years

The New York Times: The Drone That Killed My Grandson
"I learned that my 16-year-old grandson, Abdulrahman — a United States citizen — had been killed by an American drone strike from news reports the morning after he died. My grandson was killed by his own government. The Obama administration must answer for its actions and be held accountable. On Friday, I will petition a federal court in Washington to require the government to do just that." Nasser al-Awlaki writes in the opinion pages of The New York Times.

3 years

Prospect: Heidegger in France: Nazism and philosophy
In the 1970s, a leftist anti-humanism derived from Heidegger’s history of Being filled the gap left by the decline of Marxism, on the one hand, and the more or less complete absence in France of any tradition of normative political theory on the other. It was not the least of Faye’s achievements, in a work whose philosophical sophistication outstrips that of Farias by several orders of magnitude, to show to a French audience what German philosophers such as Jürgen Habermas have been arguing for many years: that, in fact, Heidegger’s undifferentiated and undialectical hostility to modernity was intimately bound up with his commitment to “national revolution” in Germany (a commitment that outlasted his brief formal adhesion to the Nazi Party).

3 years

TomDispatch: US imperialism "tiptoes" into Africa
In 2007, Pentagon created an Africa Command (AFRICOM) and it’s been creeping into Africa, deploying ever more forces in ever more ways doing ever more things at ever more facilities in ever more countries. While Washington talks openly about rebalancing its military assets to Asia, a pivot to Africa is quietly and unmistakably underway. With the ever-present possibility of blowback from shadowy operations on the continent, the odds are that the results of that pivot will become increasingly evident, whether or not Americans recognize them as such. Behind closed doors, the military says: “Africa is the battlefield of tomorrow, today.” It remains to be seen just when they’ll say the same to the American people.

3 years

PRWatch: Google Funds Right-Wing Groups
Google, the tech giant supposedly guided by its “don’t be evil” motto, has been funding a growing list of groups advancing the agenda of the Koch brothers.

3 years

Lobe Log: The NSA and the One Percent
An important driver is the dominant social engineering project of our time: the upward redistribution of wealth to the one percent. In the case at hand, the project was given a boost by the co-occurrence of two trends: the commodification of Big-Data technology and the post-9/11 resurgence of American paranoia. When your enemy hates you for your freedoms, don’t you want a supersized Big Brother by your side? But here’s the twist: the attendant growth in defense spending ran smack against the neoliberal push for smaller government. The solution? The rise of a bloated industry of overpaid private contractors feeding off the public trough. Bravo, one percent, the maneuver was brilliant!

3 years

Rabble: The reclamation of Taksim square and the battle of Besiktas
In the face of a challenge to the AKP’s Islamist project Erdogan also announced that the new development in Gezi Park would contain a mosque – a move predicted by protestors days before. The government wins elections by appealing to religion, order and business interests – and will likely play to these constituencies in the coming days. But despite his public pronouncements of determination authorities in Istanbul were forced into a major concession on Saturday evening, withdrawing the police from the area around Taksim Square altogether. Thousands flooded into Gezi Park to re-establish the occupation and have remained ever since.

3 years

Monthly Review: Crisis Theory, the Law of the Tendency of the Profit Rate to Fall, and Marx’s Studies in the 1870s
With regard to crisis theory, Marx is increasingly convinced that inquiry basically has not come far enough for him to proceed to an “appropriate” presentation of the “real movement” that he speaks of in the post face of the second edition of volume writes noted Marxist scholar Michael Heinrich in his Monthly Review essay.

4 years

Monthly Review: Crisis Theory, the Law of the Tendency of the Profit Rate to Fall, and Marx’s Studies in the 1870s
With regard to crisis theory, Marx is increasingly convinced that inquiry basically has not come far enough for him to proceed to an “appropriate” presentation of the “real movement” that he speaks of in the post face of the second edition of volume writes noted Marxist scholar Michael Heinrich in his Monthly Review essay.

4 years

The Independent: Thatcherism was a national catastrophe that still poisons us
The challenge ahead is the same as it was yesterday: to tear down the whole edifice of Thatcherism, heal Britain of the damage done, and build a country run in the interests of working people. It’s a fight we must all fight. The champagne is on ice until we win it.

4 years

Monthly Review: Marx, Kalecki, and Socialist Strategy
Nevertheless, Kalecki’s arguments on not accepting the economic rationale of the system and insisting on the need to wrest social power from the capitalist class remain crucial today. The danger of the profit-squeeze theory of economic crisis under capitalism has always been that it suggested to workers that the pursuit of their own democratic, egalitarian aspirations led directly to economic slowdown, worsening their situation. As Kalecki put it, “There are certain ‘workers’ friends’ who try to persuade the working class to abandon the fight for wages in its own interest, of course. The usual argument used for this purpose is that the increase of wages causes unemployment, and thus is detrimental to the working class as a whole. This position is visible in the United States today with the debate over whether to introduce a paltry increase in the minimum-wage writes J.B. Foster.

4 years

Guardian: Novelist Chinua Achebe dies, aged 82
Chinua Achebe, the Nigerian novelist seen by millions as the father of African literature, has died at the age of 82. A novelist, poet and essayist, Achebe was perhaps best known for his first novel Things Fall Apart, which was published in 1958. The author is also known for the influential essay An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad's Heart of Darkness (1975), a hard-hitting critique of Conrad in which he says the author turned the African continent into "a metaphysical battlefield devoid of all recognisable humanity, into which the wandering European enters at his peril", asking: "Can nobody see the preposterous and perverse arrogance in thus reducing Africa to the role of props for the break-up of one petty European mind?"

4 years

The Nation: How Climate Change Became a 'Liberal Hoax'
Noam Chomsky talks about how the Chamber of Commerce, the American Petroleum Institute and other business lobbies are enthusiastically carrying out campaigns "to try and convince the population that global warming is a liberal hoax."

4 years

EPW: Viva Chávez!
Vijay Prashad writes on Chávez. His immense charisma, earthy charm and frank disdain for the old ruling classes endeared him to the ordinary people – whose adoration of him was seen often on the streets of Venezuela, whether in the 2002 failed coup against him, during the many election campaigns, and of course after his death.

4 years

Climate & Capitalism: Hugo Chavez, undefeated
The rich and powerful of the world did not hate Chavez because he was a dictator. Deep down the sentient among them know he wasn't. They hated him because he was symbolic of a threat to the dictatorship of Capital, a figurehead of a continent alive with social movements and millions of people conscious of their political power.

4 years

Democracy Now!: Recalling the rebellious life of Rosa Parks
Born on Feb. 4, 1913, today would have been Rosa Parks’ 100th birthday. On Dec. 1, 1955, Parks refused to give up her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in Montgomery, Alabama. Her act of resistance led to a 13-month boycott of the Montgomery bus system that would help spark the civil rights movement.

4 years

Monthly Review: Book Review: The Endless Crisis
This is a most remarkable and important book. It is political economy at its best. It offers a sophisticated explanation of the socio-economic crisis facing the global and domestic economies. The Endless Crisis: How Monopoly-Finance Capital Produces Stagnation and Upheaval from the USA to China by John Bellamy Foster and Robert Waterman McChesney, reviewed by Hans G. Despain.

4 years

Monthly Review: The Planetary Emergency
The dream that technology alone, considered in some abstract sense, can solve the environmental problem, allowing for unending economic growth without undue ecological effects through an absolute decoupling of one from the other, is quickly fading. Not only are technological solutions limited by the laws of physics, but they are also subject to the laws of capitalism itself. - A powerful analytical piece by John Bellamy Foster and Brett Clark.

4 years

AlterNet: How Organizing for Change Is Very Different Than Winning Elections
Jane McAlevey talks about her new book "Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell)" about how to organize labor the right way and and why the worst thing to happen to labor in the U.S. might just have been purging the Communists from the movement.

4 years

The Hindu: A truly international historian
Hobsbawm was born in the year of the Russian Revolution, 1917 and joined the Communist Party in 1936, at the beginning of the Spanish Civil War. He never gave up his sense of political partisanship. His heterodox views on Marxism were not acceptable to many in the communist parties, but there is no doubt that he remained an influential and sympathetic critic of existing socialism in the 20th century. However, he never renounced his communist past and his lifelong commitment to the Left cause.

4 years

Guardian: Eric Hobsbawm 1917-2012: not the end of history
We have no clear perspective on how the crisis can lead to a socialist transformation and, to be honest, no real expectation that it will," he wrote in 1978. More than 30 years on, we still live in that world today and that tough message is still true. Making sense of it requires tough reasoning. That was always Mr Hobsbawm's kind. It is needed more than ever now that he is no longer able to provide it.

4 years

The Paris Review: [Interview] Pablo Neruda, The Art of Poetry
I set out to make myself a part of the great human multitude. My life matured, and that is all. It was in the style of the last century for poets to be tormented melancholiacs. But there can be poets who know life, who know its problems, and who survive by crossing through the currents. And who pass through sadness to plenitude. - Neruda.

4 years

Workers' Forum: "ഉയര്‍ന്നുവരുന്ന" ലോകത്തില്‍ ഉയര്‍ന്നുവരുന്ന ഇടതുപക്ഷം
സോഷ്യലിസ്റ്റ് പ്രയോഗത്തിന്റെ അടിസ്ഥാനപരമായ പരിസരം സാധുവായിത്തന്നെ തുടരുകയാണ്. മുതലാളിത്തത്തിന്റെ അസമവും ചൂഷണാധിഷ്ഠിതവും മര്‍ദ്ദനപരവുമായ സ്വഭാവം; സമൂഹത്തില്‍ പരിവര്‍ത്തനം വരുത്താനും അങ്ങനെ തങ്ങളുടെ ഭാവിയെ പുരോഗമനപരമായ ദിശയിലേക്ക് നയിക്കാനുമുള്ള മനുഷ്യരാശിയുടെ ശേഷി; അങ്ങനെ ചെയ്യുന്നതിനുവേണ്ട കൂട്ടായ സംഘടനയുടെ ആവശ്യകത. ലോകത്തിന്റെ നാനാഭാഗങ്ങളില്‍ പൊട്ടിമുളച്ചുവരുന്ന സോഷ്യലിസ്റ്റ് ബദലുകളുടെ പുഷ്കലത്വം സൂചിപ്പിക്കുന്നത് സോഷ്യലിസ്റ്റ് പരിപാടി ഇപ്പോഴും വളരെയധികം ഊര്‍ജ്ജസ്വലവും ആവേശകരവും തന്നെയാണ് എന്നാണ്.

4 years

Guardian: After Capitalism: 'In the anti-worlds of daily struggles the world beyond capitalism is to be found'
Marxist sociologist John Holloway argues that a world after capitalism is already being imagined in struggles around the world. In the first of a six-part Gaurdian series, author's words are accompanied by animation by students at Central Saint Martins college.

4 years

Socialist Worker: Siding with the greatest purveyor of violence
Paul D'Amato, challenges Pham Binh's newfound position that the left should have supported NATO's war on Libya in order to advance the revolution against dictator Muammar Gaddafi--and that it should take the same pro-intervention position today in Syria in order to support the struggle against the regime of Bashar al-Assad.

4 years

Monthly Review: What is going on in Syria these days?
Radwan Mortada asks the Syrian National Reconciliation Minister Ali Haidar, who is also the President of the Syrian Social Nationalist Party (SSNP). Haidar is optimistic, but still thinks that "Syria is on top of a volcano."

4 years

The New York Review of Books: The Violent Visions of Slavoj Žižek
Whether or not Marx’s vision of communism is “the inherent capitalist fantasy,” Žižek’s vision—which apart from rejecting earlier conceptions lacks any definite content—is well adapted to an economy based on the continuous production of novel commodities and experiences, each supposed to be different from any that has gone before. John Gray explores the work of Slavo Žižek, one of the world’s best-known public intellectuals.

4 years

Guardian: The real Euro 2012: the economic championship of Europe
As European nations clash on the football fields of Poland and Ukraine, many of their economies are facing something more like relegation. Who would come out on top in the struggle to avoid economic crisis? Brilliant graphic interactive on Eurozone crisis by Guardian.

4 years

Common Dreams: Socialism Is Not Dead
The fundamental premises of socialism remain: the unequal, exploitative and oppressive nature of capitalism; the capacity of human beings to change society and thereby alter their own future in a progressive direction; and the necessity of collective organization to do so. The fecundity of the socialist alternatives cropping up in different parts of the world suggests that – whatever we may think to the contrary – socialism has lost nothing of its dynamism and excitement.

4 years

People's Democracy: Venezuela Unveils Revolutionary Labour Law
R Arun Kumar writes about the new labour law that Hugo Chavez, president of Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, signed on International Labour Day. The new law defines work as a social process, guarantees minimum wages, right to organise, strike and ensures equality in work place is seen as the most important piece of legislation since the Bolivarian constitution of 1999.

4 years

Full Stop: In conversation with Aijaz Ahmed
Aijaz Ahmad is the author of many influential books on literature, politics, and cultural theory, including In Theory, Lineages of the Present, and In Our Time: Empire, Politics, Culture. An interview with Dr. Ahmad discussing the history and status of leftist publishing, the Arab Spring, and his own formation as a thinker, writer, and political activist.

4 years

Nation of Change: "There are Marxists in India?" Economist Prabhat Patnaik on the Global Crisis
Patnaik said that neither of the two most obvious responses to the financial crisis -- creating a surrogate global state to impose controls on finance, or “delinking” a nation’s economy from the global finance system -- are in the cards now.

5 years

Monthly Review: Food as a commodity
Although food is mostly plentiful, malnutrition is still common. The contradiction between plentiful global food supplies and widespread malnutrition and hunger arises primarily from food being considered a commodity, just like any other, says Fred Magdoff in Monthly Review.

5 years

The New York Times: Internet Access Is Not a Human Right
There is a high bar for something to be considered a human right. Loosely put, it must be among the things we as humans need in order to lead healthy, meaningful lives, like freedom from torture or freedom of conscience. It is a mistake to place any particular technology in this exalted category, since over time we will end up valuing the wrong things, says Google's Vint Cerf.

5 years

Ceasefire: PLO embrace of Hamas could signal paradigm shift
Generally speaking, the inter-Palestinian reconciliation talks have become the new peace "process” – all process, no peace. But since the ongoing Egyptian revolution successfully dispatched ex-dictator Hosni Mubarak, there seems to have been a substantive shift. Hamas could join the Palestine Liberation Organisation for the first time. Asa Winstanley writes on these new dynamics.

5 years

Socialist Review: "The union is a shield and our sword is the strike" - Socialists elected to Egyptian Doctors' Union
Radical leftist candidates won major successes in recent elections to Egypt's Doctors' Union, long a bastion of the Muslim Brotherhood. Mohammed Shafiq, an organiser of this electoral campaign and a doctor at Manshiyet al-Bakri hospital in Cairo speaks to Socialist Review

5 years

Guardian: History will remember Bradley Manning better
Since his arrest, Manning has been in solitary confinement, for much of the time in Quantico, Virginia, under conditions so harsh that the UN special rapporteur on torture is investigating. Many believe the US government is trying to break Manning in order to use him in its expected case of espionage against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange. It also sends a dramatic message to any potential whistle-blower: "We will destroy you."

5 years

Counter Currents: The Indian Land Grab In Africa
Indian companies venturing abroad is always regarded as a healthy trend, an indicator of India's new-found economic status. But little is known about how these companies are flexing their imperalistic muscles in poorer countries, grabbing the land and giving little in return. A report ‘India’s Role in the New Global Farmland Grab’ by researcher Rick Rowden brings forth these atrocities which are shockingly similar to what India used to blame rich western countires for.

5 years

Monthly Review: Civil Society, NGOs, and the Public Sphere
Civil society is a fiction, just as the state that is put in opposition to it -- all without class determinations in liberal theory. To democratize is to decommodify, to affirm the public sphere to the detriment of the commercial sphere. To democratize is to strengthen the role of citizens to the detriment of the role of consumers. To democratize is to bring democratization into the very heart of the state.

5 years

Frontline: Tyranny of finance
European leaders have explicitly been giving preference to the appeasement of financial markets over the requirements of political democracy. Jayati Ghosh writes on how European leaders explicitly placed the appeasement of financial markets over the requirements of political democracy.

5 years

Counter Currents: Corporate Lobbying Gaining Strength In India
Crores of rupees have been spent over the past few years by some of the big multinational corporations to seek an entry into India. What may appear to be economic decisions taken by the government often turn out to be the result of intense lobbying by foreign companies. Besides Wal-Mart Stores, the coffee shop giant Starbucks has been lobbying in India seeking 100 per cent FDI in single brand retail. As per a disclosure statement it made before the American Senate, the company had spent more than Rs 1-crore in the first 6 months of 2011, for “market opening initiatives in India.”

5 years

Counter Currents: ‘Finish Capitalism' Movement In The United States
The wages of imperialist countries are still much higher than the wages of the backward and under-developed countries. But now for maintaining their profit the imperialists are physically transferring their factories to under-developed countries where wages are incomparably cheaper, thus forcing their own workers out of employment. This is happening continuously and on an increasingly higher scale. This undoubtedly is the social and material base of the ‘ Occupy Wall Street ' movement and cries of ‘We are the 99%' and ‘Finish capitalism'.

5 years

Brecht Forum: A New Economic Strategy
The full text of the acceptance speech by Dr. Jayati Ghosh, at the award function of the ILO Decent Work Research Prize, 2010. The Prize was awarded to Dr. Ghosh in recognition of her major scholarly contributions to the analysis of socio-economic relationships and policy instruments for the advancement of decent work.

5 years

Democracy Now!: Propaganda Used Ahead of Iraq War Is Now Being Reused over Iran’s Nuke Program
In his latest article for The New Yorker blog, titled "Iran and the IAEA," Pulitzer award winning journalist Seymour Hersh argues the recent IAEA report is a "political document," not a scientific study. "They [JSOC] found nothing. Nothing. No evidence of any weaponization," Hersh says. "In other words, no evidence of a facility to build the bomb. They have facilities to enrich, but not separate facilities to build the bomb. This is simply a fact."

5 years

Hindustan Times: Shelter from the storm
Like the earlier effort to overcome the crisis by converting corporate insolvencies into sovereign insolvencies laid the seeds of the current crisis, the current prescription of seeking to emerge from this crisis by meeting the costs of sovereign debt by imposing greater burdens on the people is laying the seeds of another deeper crisis - writes Sitaram Yechury.

5 years

Guardian: Greece, home of democracy, deprived of a vote
The idea that the Greek people might directly be able to decide their future terrified leaders across Europe and around the world. Financial markets panicked, sending stocks plummeting and bond yields soaring.

5 years

Monthly Review: The Global Reserve Army of Labor and the New Imperialism
The new imperialism of the late twentieth and twenty-first centuries is thus characterized, at the top of the world system, by the domination of monopoly-finance capital, and, at the bottom, by the emergence of a massive global reserve army of labor. The result of this immense polarization, is an augmentation of the “imperialist rent” extracted from the South through the integration of low-wage, highly exploited workers into capitalist production.

5 years

Wikileaks: Banking Blockade on WikiLeaks
An arbitrary financial blockade has been imposed by Bank of America, VISA, MasterCard, PayPal and Western Union destroying 95% of its revenue, while the US government itself found that there were no lawful grounds to add WikiLeaks to a US financial blockade.

5 years

: The Occupied Wall St Journal
The Occupied Wall St Journal from the streets of New York

5 years

Boston Review: The Responsibility of Intellectuals, Redux
What are the obligations of intellectuals in this day and age, asks Noam Chomsky. Intellectuals are typically privileged—merely an observation about usage of the term. Privilege yields opportunity, and opportunity confers responsibilities. An individual then has choices.

5 years

Open Magazine: Spiritual Bedfellows
The Norway massacre and the Indian connection. Even though Anders Breivik alone pulled the trigger, the massacre in Norway was by no means the work of Breivik alone. He is a product of years of immersion in a worldwide web of anti-Islamic ideas espoused by cultural purists and nationalists of all stripes.

5 years

Guardian: There is a context to London's riots that can't be ignored
"social problems" (crime, ill-health, imprisonment rates, mental illness) are far more common in unequal societies than ones with better economic distribution and less gap between the richest and the poorest. Decades of individualism, competition and state-encouraged selfishness – combined with a systematic crushing of unions and the ever-increasing criminalisation of dissent – have made Britain one of the most unequal countries in the developed world.

5 years

Guardian: What does it mean to 'break up' media power?
The phone-hacking scandal and the subsequent launch of a public inquiry examining not simply the ethics and regulation of the press but media ownership more generally, provides a fantastic opportunity to challenge concentrations of media power and replace them with new and more democratic structures.

5 years